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Deep Blue Goes Upstairs!

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Deep Blue brings it's unique blend of Chicago style jazz and blues to Montreal's famous Upstairs Jazz Bar and grill on Thursday October 15. 8PM.

We're very excited to be returning to Upstairs. Deep Blue got it's start at Upstairs and we're looking forward to playing there again. "We come to play" is our motto and it's for sure we'll be pushing the envelope so don't miss this show!

Upstairs: 1254 Mackay, 514-931-6808

From the Montreal Gazette

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Seven Days, Seven Nights: From big city blues to loving cityscapes RICHARD BURNETT, SPECIAL TO MONTREAL GAZETTE
Monday, Jan. 26 Chicago native and old-school tenor/soprano saxman Johnny Beaudine headlines the downtown House of Jazz tonight with his band Deep Blue, featuring pianist Peter Mika, bass player Ben Comeau and drummer Jeffrey Simons. “What we’re doing here is a kind of blues/jazz I used to see in Chicago,” says Beaudine, who learned to play the harp from his mentors Junior Wells and James Cotton. “Lesser known than the electric Chicago blues scene, which I was a part of, this music is more upscale, with jazz and R&B influences, but was very popular in the black community. I used to hear this music in black clubs like the Burning Spear and the Tropical Hut. More Ray Charles, early Lou Rawls, with touches of Sonny Stitt and Gene Aamons, two of my saxophone heroes. I wanted to do this for years, but you have to have a really good band to even attempt it. Now we do.” Deep Blue

Johnny Beaudine and Deep Blue - Soprano Sax

As many of you know, I play the soprano sax. My horn is very special, it's a King, made in the late 1920's. It has a very unique sound, at times like a clarinet and other times a bit like a trumpet.
Over the last few years I many hours of practice with that horn to be able to use that sound in blues and especially, jazz. I love the way it fits in with Deep Blue.

I was watching a DVD today and Kenny G showed up.  I wondered, "How many people learned to hate the soprano sax from being forced to listen to Kenny G.

My new slogan: "Johnny Beaudine, taking the soprano sax back from Kenny G".